Forum / Let's Discuss! / Unraveling Scoliosis with Kuan Hui Chew

This topic contains 9 replies.
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Amy600
On: January 04, 2018 04:04 AM
Hello, The Unraveling Scoliosis Workshop sounds intriguing and I had a few questions. Is this workshop appropriate for those clients with osteoporosis and scoliosis? Does this workshop discuss the Schroth method? Is the vestibular, visual and proprioception systems and their relationship to scoliosis mentioned in this workshop? Thank you.
Kuan331
On: January 04, 2018 06:34 AM
Hi, I would say at least 85 percent of the materials are appropriate for clients with osteoporosis and scoliosis. Schroth method is not mentioned in the workshop. Even though Vestibular, visual and proprioception is not a main focus of the workshop, but it is touched upon, Session 10 is dedication to this topic. Hope this is helpful.
Judy Jutcovich
On: January 04, 2018 17:18 PM
Hi, My question is about a student who has a right thoracic scoliotic curve and a right forward shoulder. Also a small left lumbar curve with a hiked left hip and the left leg presents longer. If I release and lower left hip, wont it create a longer leg than it presently is? Thank you.
Amy600
On: January 04, 2018 19:15 PM
[QUOTE="Amy600, post: 769, member: 608"]Hello, The Unraveling Scoliosis Workshop sounds intriguing and I had a few questions. Is this workshop appropriate for those clients with osteoporosis and scoliosis? Does this workshop discuss the Schroth method? Is the vestibular, visual and proprioception systems and their relationship to scoliosis mentioned in this workshop? Thank you.[/QUOTE] [QUOTE="Kuan331, post: 770, member: 6440"]Hi, I would say at least 85 percent of the materials are appropriate for clients with osteoporosis and scoliosis. Schroth method is not mentioned in the workshop. Even though Vestibular, visual and proprioception is not a main focus of the workshop, but it is touched upon, Session 10 is dedication to this topic. Hope this is helpful.[/QUOTE] Yes. Thank you.
Kuan331
On: January 05, 2018 11:54 AM
[QUOTE="Judy Jutcovich, post: 771, member: 8812"]Hi, My question is about a student who has a right thoracic scoliotic curve and a right forward shoulder. Also a small left lumbar curve with a hiked left hip and the left leg presents longer. If I release and lower left hip, wont it create a longer leg than it presently is? Thank you.[/QUOTE] Hi, Generally speaking, when there is a left lumbar curve/with the apex to the left, the structures on the left are locked long and tends to be more developed, the structures on the right are more compressed and are under delveloped, hence we need to lengthened and strengthened the right side. However, it is common to have a left compression around L4/L5, L5/S1 when there is a left lumbar curve, in such cases, you can focus on lengthening the anterior structures such as the psoas and Iliacus, and strengthen the lower gluts and upper hamstrings, particularly the medial hamstrings.
victoria977
On: February 26, 2018 14:37 PM
Hi, I have been working with a couple of clients with scoliosis and found this workshop very helpful and very well done. It reinforced what I was doing and previous training. It also gave me a lot of new information and exercises to try! It energized my work with my clients. Thank you so much!
Kuan331
On: February 27, 2018 16:09 PM
Very happy to hear you find this workshop helpful, thank you for writing.
Beena540
On: March 09, 2018 08:36 AM
HI,EXTREMELY INFORMATIVE WORKSHOP.IT SHOWS YOUR DEEP KNOWLEDGE AND INTEREST OF THE SUBJECT.I WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT THE MAINTAINENCE EXERCISES YOU WOULD PREFER THE PATIENT TO CONTINUE FURTHER TO REMAIN MORE CENTRALISE.AND ALSO ANY A LRTERNATIVE FOR SCOOTER OR REFORMER.CAN WE USE AN ARC ? THANKS AND REGARDS
Kuan331
On: March 10, 2018 17:08 PM
Depending on the client’s curvatures, you can pick a few mat exercises that target the client’s strongest scoliotic tendency/primary curve. Always start with rolling (with a ball or a roller) or stretching the short and weak muscles, then strengthen the weak muscles, this sequence is important. You might also want to look at how they walk, how they stand, how they seat in a chair, and how they get in and out of a chair, these repetitive motions have big effects on the body. Make sure they walk, seat and stand in a relatively symmetrical way, that will help remind them to remain ‘centered’ throughout the day. A good alternative to Scooter is to do deep lunges. If you have access to a Bosu or any prop that challenges balance, place the front foot on the top of the Bosu or a prop, take a wide stance for deep lunges. Make sure the body is well aligned throughout the exercise, particularly the pelvis. This is a great way to improve strength, flexibility and proprioception all at the same time.
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