Forum / Let's Discuss! / Scapula Revolution Workshop Question

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Bonnie_221
On: April 16, 2014 14:52 PM
Hi Lesley, Thank you so much for such a terrific workshop! I have watched your workshop a few times already and keep learning new things! I do have a few questions for you. I am having a hard time figuring out how to word this question but here we go... Do the scapula always hug the ribs in all exercises? For instance in the exercise Hug a Tree on the reformer, we want our scapula to stay wide and not over use the rhomboids to pull the scapula off the ribs. Is that correct? We need to be able to move our arms in this exercise while keeping the scapula quiet and stabilize from our serratus? So if I have my arms up in a goal post position and I bring them back behind my spine, I should not squeeze my blades together to do this. They need to stay wide? I have a few clients in their 80's that are extremely kyphotic and their shoulder blades have pulled so far away from their spine. Would this be a "spinal issue" to address rather than strengthen shoulder blade muscles to bring the blades back to mid line and stretching their pecs. Are there exercises where we would retract the shoulder blades? Hope you can understand my questions. Thanks very much! I have watched your workshop a few times already and keep learning new things! Bonnie Lafave
gwen
On: April 16, 2014 15:24 PM
I have a client with pain in both elbows (she has osteoarthritis and also has pain in wrists, knees and hips) and she is afraid to do any arm work at all in the fear that it might cause her more elbow pain. But I was wondering if scapula glides might be appropriate. I would love to see her gain more confidence and be able to move her arms safely and without fear. Can you suggest exercises that could help her upper body without while keeping her elbows and wrists soft? We usually work on Cadillac. Thanks for input! Gwen
Lesley
On: April 17, 2014 14:26 PM
[b]Scapular hugs and retractions[/b] Do the scapula always hug the ribs in all exercises? The scapula is a reflection of the arms and it's placement on the ribs in space. If the arms are forward sagitally, the scapula is wrapping around the ribs. If my arms are in double leg kick, my scapula are sliding together on the ribs towards the spine. I like to use the term " hug" to create a dynamic use of the shoulder blade. A hug embraces but does not choke or locks down. For instance in the exercise Hug a Tree on the reformer, we want teach our clients to keep their scapula wide and with some tension on the straps. If they let the arms to go behind them, it changes the tension on the straps. Keeping the scapula wide helps targets the serratus and the core. If you bring your arms behind your head and back, the scapula will slide together. Having your arms up in a goal post position is a different feeling then the arms in double leg kick. There are degrees of tone depending on the action. Too much tone for the action can lock up a movement. I have a few clients in their 80's that are extremely kyphotic and their shoulder blades have pulled so far away from their spine. Kyphotic posture has a a lot of weakness of upper spinal muscles as well as tightness of the muscles of the shoulder girdle. Most probably their scapula is in downward rotation which wings the scapula out. They need both releasing of tight structures and strengthening of the spine and the arms and shoulder girdle. Healthy muscles have movement. Kyphotic posture is a reflection of a locked down spine and shoulder girdle. Are there exercises where we would retract the shoulder blades? Double leg kick, versions of back rowing. The ability of retraction allows for the dynamic range of motion of the shoulder girdle. Putting on a shirt or coat we have to let the shoulder blades retract. On a full push-up the shoulder blades should retract. Phrasing is essential. If we retract the shoulder blade in the beginning of the push-up, the workload will go into our necks. In this video, I emphasized the width and the use of the serratus. There is a lot of poor information about the shoulder girdle. Many of the cues lock the shoulder blade which creates imbalances and possible injuries. A healthy shoulder should have a full range of motion.
Lesley
On: April 17, 2014 14:28 PM
Reeducation of the shoulder girdle is essential for healthy mechanics. When I demonstrated how the bones moves, these are all ways to teach the client how the shoulder moves. When I worked with a lot of journalists with repetitive stress injuries to wrists and hands, this new awareness is the building blocks for healthy mechanics. When you learn to move the arm from the scapula, it will take the stress off the wrist and hands. Start w. Mobilizing and educating about scapula/humeral rhythm. 1. Push through is a great exercise. I would assist with the load. Keep load light and take some of the load if required. 2. The exercises on the elbows are a great way to train. Maybe add more cushioning. 3. Arms in straps. The client needs to learn about a neutral wrist. The work should happen first at the shoulder girdle not the wrists. Some clients weak in the shoulder girdle overcompensate with their wrists and hands. Balanced Body has special straps for the wrists. Some exercises put the straps on the forearm like in variations of back rowing. 4. Springs might be too heavy so use Therabands 5. One of the problems of weight bearing arms on reformer is the footbar. A flat surface can give some clients better feedback. Not addressing the arms at all, could make things worse for her. If she fell, she needs to have the strength in her arms to get up. Movement is essential with osteoarthritis. Invite movement in with low loads and repetitions at first to assist in confidence of working with this condition. You want to get the muscles of the shoulder girdle and arms to do more work. This will take stress off of the elbows and wrists. Soft elbows is not a goal. Too bent arms changes the scapular rhythm and could put more stress on the wrists.
Bonnie_221
On: April 17, 2014 17:38 PM
Thank you so much for your detailed explanations to my questions, Lesley! Very helpful! You are great!
gwen
On: April 23, 2014 12:47 PM
Thank you so much; this is great info. She absolutely loved the scapular glides and push through bar with light springs, which was great because she had a lot of fear about doing any kind of arm work.
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