Forum / Let's Discuss! / Best Positions in Prenatal Pilates

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Anastasiya
On: January 14, 2013 08:10 AM
I have a personal Prenatal question that I think can benefit a lot of instructors working with prenatal clients. Currently I am in my 6th month of pregnancy. And just a month ago we found out that I am expecting twins (my second set.) I know a lot about going through the pregnancy with multiples and I was lucky enough to have a vaginal birth the first time. I would like to keep it the same way this time around too. I read somewhere that certain moves are more beneficial than others to help the baby get in the head-down position. Can you recommend anything in terms of Pilates that can help me? The book Female Pelvis has a permanent spot on my night stand so I keep referring to it a lot. I also use use Jennifer's Prenatal DVD a lot. It's great!!! I was wondering if there is anything else that you could recommend to me to get prepared for the BIG DAY. I want to learn as much about the pregnant body as possible while I still can (I am pretty sure that we will be 100% done after these girls are born :-)) Oh, and I don't have any complications right now and my OB gave me OK to exercise (within reason of course.) Thanks, Anastasiya
JenniferGianni
On: January 16, 2013 19:04 PM
Hi Anastasiya, First, I am so happy for you! You will be a busy momma. I am so happy that you are using The Female Pelvis book. There is such great information in it and it is a great book to keep going back to. In pregnancy we want to avoid any position ( especially ones that we hold for more than a minute) that bring us farther into the pregnant posture. Going farther into the pregnant posture is accomplished in positions that compress the space for the baby and at the same time close the front of momma's body. In the Female Pelvis the author warns against sitting in a deck chair or a soft couch for too long . This passive position not only brings mom more into her rounded, forward position but it also encourages the baby into a sunny side up position with the back of its head to the sacrum and its face towards the pubic bone. This creates some problems in delivery. We want to take this to heart when training our pregnant clients in the studio. Props like The C Shaper are a no no for pregnancy. The C Shaper was meant to be used for clients with neck and upper back issues not pregnancy. One of the best positions to train our pregnant clients is on all fours. Carpal Tunnel is very common in pregnancy because of the hormone release ( it usually disappears after pregnancy) so instead of the hands for an all 4's position we use the forearms on the floor or on a sitting box. In this position we can do so many exercises to improve the pregnant body and prepare them for there post pregnant challenges. For example, the all 4's position is the best for creating awareness and strength in our pregnancy abdominal, the transverse abdominis. It is also a wonderful place to explore spinal and pelvic articulation. And the icing on the cake is that this posture will be so important to moms comfort and progressing the delivery during labor. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any more questions and send me a picture of you pregnant! Love, Jen
Anastasiya
On: January 18, 2013 11:55 AM
Thanks Jen! [ATTACH]1.vB[/ATTACH] I hope the picture will go through on the Forum. I'll also email it to you just in case it doesn't. People keep asking me if I am due in a couple of weeks :-)) (and I still have until at least April!) I had one more small question for you. Diastasis recti is my reality right now (and I was prepared for it.) I am obviously not doing any crunches or ab exercises (except for strengthening my transverse abdominals on all fours.) Is there anything else that I can do right now to minimize diastasis (I have about 2-3 fingers right now)? And what should I start with right after the babies are born? Love, Anastasiya
JenniferGianni
On: January 22, 2013 16:17 PM
Hi A, Every pregnant woman ( esp at the third trimester) will have a diastasis. This can be compounded by a second pregnancy especially if you never healed from the first pregnancy and delivery. Genetic tendencies and movement choices before and after delivery will determine how well you heal and if the connective tissue regains its tension. Don't be fooled, this is not just about the rectus abdominis. The linea alba is a very complex piece of connective tissue . You must address the fascial loosening in your whole core corset. The more you connect to these principles through the brain breath connection during pregnancy the quicker you will bounce back after. You must take the Fusion Pre and Post natal teacher training at some point. Maybe in a few years. We have a new set of pre/post natal on the stability balls with all my new cueing for pelvic floor and the rest of the inner corset. I think you would enjoy them. Love Jen
JenniferGianni
On: January 22, 2013 16:17 PM
Hi A, Every pregnant woman ( esp at the third trimester) will have a diastasis. This can be compounded by a second pregnancy especially if you never healed from the first pregnancy and delivery. Genetic tendencies and movement choices before and after delivery will determine how well you heal and if the connective tissue regains its tension. Don't be fooled, this is not just about the rectus abdominis. The linea alba is a very complex piece of connective tissue . You must address the fascial loosening in your whole core corset. The more you connect to these principles through the brain breath connection during pregnancy the quicker you will bounce back after. You must take the Fusion Pre and Post natal teacher training at some point. Maybe in a few years. We have a new set of pre/post natal on the stability balls with all my new cueing for pelvic floor and the rest of the inner corset. I think you would enjoy them. Love Jen
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